interdash

Artists

Judith Boily, Marie Gelinas, Alexsandra Meloul
Inside War 
2008
Charcoal animation and drawing; charcoal, pastel and slate paint on foam board
 

This work deals with the mutability of the body and the dualism that defines human experience. By working exclusively in black and white, we wanted to create an intimate atmosphere to explore the concept of duality within the human experience of living with a condition that affects the immune defenses, like HIV or AIDS. Through our project, we looked into this experience closely with regards to two particular aspects: a subjective human scale, how it affects a person’s soul, spirit and way of living but also on a more abstract micro scale, how it affects the biological body. 
 

Vincent Chevalier
So… when did you figure out that you had AIDS?
2009
Performative artist talk 

So…when did you figure out that you had AIDS?  is a performative artist’s talk examining issues around identity, representation, and disclosure. Beginning with home video of me recorded when I was a pre-teen and surveying a number of interdisciplinary works developed over the last 15 years, the talk will document the performance of an “AIDS” identity throughout my practice. By highlighting notions of performativity within my personal art and identity histories, I hope to challenge narratives around being a person living with HIV/AIDS, and to question what normally constitutes an artistic practice.

 
Conrad
b. 1983
2008
Broadsheet xerox

Conrad is an infamous thief, outlaw academic and a notorious liar

This broadsheet poster originally found itself plastered on the streets of Portland, Maine in the summer of 2008. It was designed, printed, and illegally posted by Conrad, a member of the Maine radical queer/trans direction action group, the Naughty North Collective. It now hangs on gallery walls in Germany and the US, and has been featured on the both the Wooster Collective and ACT UP/NY websites.
 

ShayO Detchema
Pharmaclash
2009
Installation multimedia interactive

Images d’auto-évaluation psychologique, phonographie, improvisation sonore et spoken word sont utilisés pour exposer en audiovisuel quinze  années de coexistence avec le V.I.H/sida.  Le spectateur est invité à voyager dans les multiples  univers de ma relation avec le V.I.H/sida en manipulant une bouteille de médicament qui capte les mouvements et permet une infinité de parcours sonores différents.

 
Michael Garfinkel
Mythical Interventions
2009

Mythical Interventions is an installation series that represents HIV/AIDS-related contagion misperceptions under the guise of public health announcements. Adapting to and pervading through the inter – exhibition, Mythical Interventions offers opportunities for audiences to explore past, present, and intra-personal understandings of HIV and AIDS.

 
Katerina Lagassé
untitled
2009

Our structures of knowledge exist within the confinements of discourse.  How has the language used over the past years to thematically represent the HIV/AIDS pandemic for Concordia’s annual HIV/AIDS exhibition evolved? 

 
JJ Levine
One Night Stand
2007
Silver gelatin prints

One Night Stand is a cruising narrative that chronicles a sexual encounter between two strangers. These male characters are portrayed by female-assigned and identified models, challenging the visual representation of fetishized lesbian bodies in mainstream porn, and the ever-present fear/stigmatization of gay male sex and sexuality. This work raises questions surrounding sexual identity, risk, and attraction while exploring subtle ways of destabilizing the gender imperative, pushing drag past costume to nudity.

This work also addresses stereotypes that prescribe lesbian sexuality as gentle and verging on platonic and gay male sexuality as limited to a slew of anonymous sexual encounters, assumptions that are inaccurate and warrant revision.

 
Cam Matamoros
(still) HIV Positive
2009
Hoodies, acrylic, autonomous participants

It’s not your HIV status that matters most, but your HIV politics.” – Joe Wright 

The “HIV POSITIVE” logo featured in my work originally appeared on t-shirts produced in 1998 by Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) in South Africa. The shirts were created in response to the stoning death of Gugu Dlamini when she publicly revealed her HIV + status on TV and radio. The statement literally marks the body of the wearer as HIV positive but the word ‘positive’ here remains ambiguous. Because the shirt can be removed, it does not inherently imply HIV infection in the wearer.  As a result, those who read the logo must assess their own responses to the potential of disclosure.

The project is intended to confront the public silence around HIV within the contemporary context of Montreal by offering gallery visitors who see themselves as “poz-positive” the opportunity to brand themselves visibly and publicly. These autonomous participants then carry and spread the “HIV Positive” message as they move about the city. Through this viral communication and collective performance, this work strives to raise awareness while reducing the stigma surrounding HIV.

The hand-made quality of the logos references the grass roots activist origins of the message rather than the corporate branding or social marketing for which it has often been appropriated.

 
Devora Neumark with thanks to community participants
Meditations on Beauty and Wellness
2008-2009

1) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to HOME (self awareness, grounding, survival and security)?
2) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to SELF-RESPECT (sensuality, pleasure, and creativity)?
3) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to SELF-WORTH (assertiveness and power in relation with others)?
4) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to LOVE (the ability to give and receive openheartedly to self and others)?
5) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to SELF-EXPRESSION (communication and the courage to change)?
6) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to RESPONSIBILITY (intuition, vision and balance)?
7) What does beauty and wellness mean to you in relation to CONSCIOUSNESS (acceptance)?


Johnston Newfield
Risk
2009
Stencils and spray paint

As individuals, we all make daily decisions that involve some level of risk-taking behaviour. However, because society views risk as inherently negative, a strong value judgment is dictated towards those who defy this – leading to the universal shaming of behaviour with potentially harmful consequences, leaving nuance and personal choice outside of the argument.

My piece is not in defense of the notion of risk but instead in defense of the choice to take risks and not be judged or shamed for doing so.

It’s time to take some risks, mes amis.

 
Liam Michaud-O’Grady
Quarantine
2009
Photographs

Liam is an angry faggot, born into a legacy of queer inheritance.  

Quarantine is about recuperating family narratives of violence, isolation, and containment. It is about rejecting the ways we are set up to die, through policing, incarceration, and erasure. It is about articulating resistance to these violences by forging strategies for survival. 

 
Cody Young
This Is An Exercise In Falling Asleep
2009
Sculpture, audio

This Is An Exercise In Falling Asleep seeks to start dialogues in regards to how sex is negotiated by people in different queer communities. 

My bed is a place where I sleep.  
My bed is a place where I get fucked. 

I found as the latter became of greater abundance, the former became more and more inaccessible; This Is An Exercise In Falling Asleep is about my personal experience with sex.  Specifically, this is about my anxieties with regards to how consent is – and has failed to be – negotiated in sexual contexts. This is about the importance of creating dialogues between queer communities about consent, negotiation, and safer-sex.

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